Nobody gets on Interstate 10 thinking that they are going to be slammed into by a semitruck, but some unfortunate individuals face that exact event. An 18-wheeler accident can dramatically change your life. These crashes sometimes rip people away from their family members.

Whether you are heading across the infamous Atchafalaya Basin bridge or crossing the border near Lake Charles, you need to be aware of what semitruck drivers are doing. You certainly don’t want to have the men and women of Acadian Ambulance have to come pick you up or airlift you out.

By understanding some of the common causes of these accidents, you might be able to avoid getting into one. Here are some cause of semitruck crashes to consider:

Rushing truckers

Truckers who are in a rush might not drive in a safe manner. You should watch how these big rigs are moving in relation to other traffic. Some stretches of I-10 have a lower speed limit than others. Generally, semitrucks should be driving a little slower than passenger vehicles. In most cases, they should drive in the right hand lane.

When a trucker is in a hurry, he or she might try to bend the safety regulations. Driving too many hours, for example, could result in trucker fatigue. Trying to hurry up might lead the trucker to attempt to eat a meal while zoomong at interstate speeds. This could lead to a distracted driving crash.

Other factors

Another factor that might lead to a semitruck crash includes improperly secured loads. The loads on these trucks are usually very heavy. Without proper securement, loads can shift while the truck is in motion. This can lead to the items coming off the truck or causing the truck to become unstable.

Improper maintenance can also lead to a semitruck crash. These large vehicles rely on everything working properly to stop and maneuver. If there is anything that isn’t up to par, it could lead to trouble, such as worn brakes or a wobbly hitch.

It is also possible for other drivers on the road to cause an accident. Some drivers jump in front of these large trucks without thinking about the fact that they need more distance to stop than smaller vehicles. In fact, a semitruck likely needs 20 to 40 percent more distance to stop than a passenger vehicle if the truck is driving on dry pavement.